Should airport lounges ban thongs?

By vbarberini | Jan 12, 2018, 04:42 PM
In the last 7 days I've visited The Lounge a total of eight times. On every occasions I've seen guests wearing thongs. Once, the thongs were even removed and bare feet became the mode of transport to and from the bar.

Over at QF, Mr. Dixon controversially banned the wearing of the iconic Aussie footwear in the Qantas Club. Is it time Mr. Borghetti followed suit and banned thongs from The Lounge?
Poll: Should thongs be banned in the lounge
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By airADL | Jan 12, 2018, 05:40 PM
I was in QF HK lounge 2 guys in things there were happily allowed in.

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By mannej | Jan 12, 2018, 06:23 PM
I was in QF HK lounge 2 guys in things there were happily allowed in.


The ban relates to selected domestic lounges only, and was introduced in the AJ era, not the Dixon era.
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By nige00160 | Jan 12, 2018, 08:24 PM
Well it's too hot to wear ugg boots ....
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By andyf | Jan 12, 2018, 09:10 PM
meh? I never wear thongs out of the house except to put out the garbage or if i'm going swimming - so you wouldn't catch me dead in them at an airport. But really, there are probably other things worth worrying about than if someone else is in thongs. As long as feet stay on the floor where they belong (rather than resting on chairs or tables) it shouldn't make a difference - and its not like shoes on those places are any better.
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By Dredgy | Jan 13, 2018, 02:44 AM
I just don't see the point of telling other people what they can wear, unless its an actual safety hazard. The shoes I'm walking around in would have to be way more unhygienic than my bare feet. You fail to state what the actual problem is in your original post. Do you fear for the thongs-wearer's safety? Or do you simply find them unappealing to look at? If it's the latter, then its not a problem.

I just don't see the point of banning them, and it would be very hypocritical of me to criticize people for wearing thongs and then happily wear the crappy slippers the airline provides for me on the plane.
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By rnickey mouse | Jan 13, 2018, 10:08 AM
I just don't see the point of telling other people what they can wear, unless its an actual safety hazard. The shoes I'm walking around in would have to be way more unhygienic than my bare feet. You fail to state what the actual problem is in your original post. Do you fear for the thongs-wearer's safety? Or do you simply find them unappealing to look at? If it's the latter, then its not a problem.

I just don't see the point of banning them, and it would be very hypocritical of me to criticize people for wearing thongs and then happily wear the crappy slippers the airline provides for me on the plane.
Using this logic, I look forward to being welcomed into the lounge completely naked. It's perfectly safe after all. 😜

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vbarberini

By JJJJJJJ | Jan 13, 2018, 12:09 PM
It’s mainly about the behaviour of the person wearing the thongs. For example, when you enter a restaurant with a dress code, it implicitly alerts you that a certain standard of behaviour is expected. You can’t guarantee that a person wearing dress shoes will act appropriately, but the dress code is a signal that it is expected.
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vbarberini

By lw1962 | Jan 13, 2018, 03:45 PM
From an OH&S point of view, I regard thongs as inappropriate footwear in any public places. I am a female tradie and I wear steel caps on construction sites, sandals or pumps in lounges and on aircraft and thongs around my pool. Everything has its place. If you want to wear them in your own home, fine. But if you're about to fly, have some decorum and make a small effort to wear comfortable but safe shoes. What happens if someone slices their foot on a shard of unsuspecting glass from a dropped plate, or another passenger rolls their 32kg bag over another passenger's open toes?

I hear the cash registers of a thousand lawyers going PING!
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vbarberini

By vbarberini | Jan 14, 2018, 02:41 AM

I just don't see the point of telling other people what they can wear, unless its an actual safety hazard. The shoes I'm walking around in would have to be way more unhygienic than my bare feet. You fail to state what the actual problem is in your original post. Do you fear for the thongs-wearer's safety? Or do you simply find them unappealing to look at? If it's the latter, then its not a problem.

I just don't see the point of banning them, and it would be very hypocritical of me to criticize people for wearing thongs and then happily wear the crappy slippers the airline provides for me on the plane.


Yep there is also a safety issue; specifically when the thong wearer goes from The Lounge into the aircraft. In the event of an accident thongs are the least safe footware. If an accident occurs the sharp, twisted metal will slice a thong wearers feet to ribbons. Slowing if not stopping their escape.

By contrast, leather shoes enable the wearer to walk over sharp metal in the event of an accident. Looks better and is safer :)

Last edited by vbarberini at Jan 14, 2018, 02.42 AM.
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By Doctordbx | Jan 14, 2018, 09:47 AM
Seriously this classism needs to stop over what basically amounts to a bus with wings and a lounge as a coach terminal.

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deegee93

By Adamjc | Jan 14, 2018, 11:18 AM
What's the world coming too. Who cares what people are wearing on the feet. There are plenty of other things to worry about than thongs. In our climate i think it is very appropriate to wear thongs.
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deegee93

By hakkinen5 | Jan 14, 2018, 11:18 AM
Where do you draw the line? I saw people enter the Melb lounge the other day in what basically amounted to thongs. These ones had slighty thicker straps and a designer label on them which apparently made them ok for entry.
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By deegee93 | Jan 14, 2018, 12:17 PM
Sitting in the VA lounge in Adelaide right now before a business class flight to Brisbane wearing thongs, t-shirt and jeans. My footwear isn’t changing my behaviour in the lounge or in row 1.

From a “safety” point of view the risk is no higher in the lounge than the rest of the airport so if you just want to be pretentious maybe suggest to Virgin Australia that I shouldn’t be allowed to fly business or have status with my dreadlocks either.
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murray

By GBRGB | Jan 14, 2018, 03:39 PM
Rather thongs than some of the very dirty and grease covered work boots I see on a regular basis, I wonder if these people wear them around in the house at home, I think not, don’t know why they think they should wear them in the airport or lounge.
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deegee93

By JJJJJJJ | Jan 15, 2018, 09:37 AM
Sitting in the VA lounge in Adelaide right now before a business class flight to Brisbane wearing thongs, t-shirt and jeans. My footwear isn’t changing my behaviour in the lounge or in row 1.

From a “safety” point of view the risk is no higher in the lounge than the rest of the airport so if you just want to be pretentious maybe suggest to Virgin Australia that I shouldn’t be allowed to fly business or have status with my dreadlocks either.
Taking this personally? Your specific example is insufficient data to draw a generalisable conclusion. Oh, and congrats on row 1 (now who’s pretentious?) Personally I loathe row 1; too much noise from the galley.

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