Singapore Airlines business class, SQ288 Sydney-Canberra-Singapore

Review: Singapore Airlines business class, SQ288 Sydney-Canberra-Singapore

Route:
Sydney to Singapore
Airline:
SQ (Singapore Airlines)
Cabin Class:
Business
Aircraft Type:
Boeing 777-300ER
Flight:
SQ288
Seat:
17K

service:

meals:

seating:

overall:

What's Hot

  • SQ's great business class seat
  • Book the Cook meals

What's Not

  • Transit at Canberra

X-Factor

  • Overnight from Sydney to Singapore

Introduction

Singapore Airlines’ rejig of its Canberra flights has seen the failed Wellington-Canberra-Singapore 'Capital Express' route (launched with great fanfare in September 2016) replaced by a daily Sydney-Canberra-Singapore service.

It’s a win in almost every column.

Singapore Airlines gets a fifth daily Sydney flight, increasing its appeal over the two daily Sydney-Singapore flights of Qantas.

The schedule for SQ288 gives Sydney business travellers the option of an overnight flight, departing Sydney at 9.20pm for a 5.15am arrival at Singapore’ Changi Airport – even if this means a bit of a detour via Canberra.

ACT travellers get to trade up from the older Boeing 777-200 of the Capital Express to Singapore Airlines’ flagship Boeing 777-300ER with the airline’s latest ‘open’ first class suites (albeit just four of them) and business class seats.

And everyone headed to Singapore can easily transfer to Singapore Airlines' morning wave of departures to Europe as well as many regional SQ and SilkAir flights.

Australian Business Traveller joined the inaugural flight of SQ288 from Sydney to Singapore to see how it stacks up.

Lounge

As we’ve previously detailed, Sydney has two Star Alliance lounges available to Singapore Airlines' business class passengers (and Star Alliance Gold-grade frequent flyers): these are the Singapore Airlines and Air New Zealand lounges, handily situated next door to one another at T1’s southwest pier, near gates 58-59.

(There's a handy shortcut towards this part of the airport once you're through customs and security – veer left and cut through the corridor which leads to the TRS Tax Refund office.)

A flash of your boarding pass will get you into either the SQ or NZ lounges, and indeed you can visit both before your flight.

The main drawcard of the Air New Zealand lounge for evening flights is the tended bar, which serves up a decent range of beer, wine, spirits and cocktails along with excellent barista-pulled coffee.

The bar closes at 8pm – so if you get to the airport before 8pm, this is your first port of call.

There’s a lot less going on in the food department at the AirNZ lounge in these late hours: during our visit you could choose between pork & chorizo meatballs, spiced eggplant, some sandwiches and a range of salads.

The desserts were tempting, however.

In our experience the Air New Zealand lounge also has much faster WiFi: the SQ lounge's Internet feed is as slow as a wet week in Wagga, so if ploughing through work is high on your pre-flight to-do list, choose your lounge accordingly.

Almost all of Singapore Airlines business class passengers on SQ288 will, naturally, default to the airlines' neighbouring SilverKris Lounge.

In the coffee stakes, Singapore Airlines' SilverKris lounge relies on machine-made coffee (although it also has T2 teas) but bests its Kiwi cousin in most other respects.

Around 8.30pm we found it quieter than the Air New Zealand lounge, and the semi-private ‘productivity booths’ are built with business travellers in mind: there’s room for your laptop or tablet (with AC/USB power sockets), a plate of food and a drink.

Speaking of which, the SilverKris business class lounge has far better supper fare than the Air New Zealand lounge.

During our stay we sampled the Cajun chicken thigh fillets, beef vindaloo & coconut rice, and carrot & ginger soup; there was also yellow curry basa fillet, penne pasta with pesto and sun-dried tomatoes, plus smoked salmon and salads. 

I'd suggest you take advantage of a meal at the SilverKris lounge because apart from a light snack served on the Sydney-Canberra leg, you won't see 'dinner' proper until around midnight after SQ288 heads from Canberra to Singapore.

Given that most business class passengers will likely be in the Sydney lounge 90 minutes before the flight departs, 8pm sounds about right for dinner and a drink.

Flight

If you’re joining SQ288 at Sydney it’s business as usual – make your way through immigration and security, then head to the lounge.

If you’ve come through from Singapore and are continuing to Canberra it’s a bit more involved: you get off the flight at the arrivals level, go through the transit section and head up to the departures level to reboard your flight (or duck into the SQ SilverKris lounge if there’s time enough and you’re so inclined).

The first leg of SQ288 is a nominal 30 minute sprint from Sydney to Canberra.

The schedule posits a full hour in the air (from 9.20pm to 10.20pm) so there’s quite some padding – in our case the trip had an estimated flying time of 29 minutes but saw us arriving at 10.15pm.

It has to be said, there’s something quite novel about flying from Sydney to Canberra in a mighty Boeing 777-300ER (and before you ask, no, SQ isn't allowed to sell the Sydney-Canberra segment as a domestic leg on its own).

Once the flight lands in Canberra, everybody gets off, and passengers bound for Singapore show their boarding pass before heading upstairs via escalator to the departures area.

This is where everybody spends the next hour or so.

There’s no dedicated lounge for business class travellers or frequent flyers, although Canberra Airport has done a good job of creating space with plenty of seating for solo travellers, couples, larger groups and those who need to plug in their laptop or tablet and get some work done.

There are two parts to the departures area. The first is directly ahead when you step off the escalator and features a bar selling drinks and snacks, and looks to be the busiest and noisiest area.

But beyond that, across from a small duty-free store, is another wing of the departures lounge which during our stopover was far less patronised and thus a lot quieter.

While there's only an hour at most in this departures area, I felt that Singapore Airlines could have done something a little more for its business and first class passengers, such as reserving a section of seating and offering a free coffee or tea at the bar upon showing you boarding pass.

The second and longer leg of SQ288, from Canberra to Singapore, saw us called to reboard the flight from 11pm in time for an 11.30pm departure

Business class passengers get a pair of socks, slippers and eye-mask for the overnight leg, with further amenities (including dental and shaving kits) stocked in the bathroom, although no pyjamas are handed out.

After a 7½ hour trek north-west to Singapore, we touched down at a still-dark 5am.

(Business travel trivia: this entire service carries a single flight number of SQ288 because it effectively runs as a Singapore-Sydney-Canberra loop rather than be broken up into two discrete legs, each with their own flight number.)

Seat

Singapore Airlines’ Boeing 777-300ER is fitted with the airline’s Next Generation business class seats, which made their debut in mid-2013 and have since been carried over to the newer Airbus A350 jets.

Arranged in a forward-facing (not angled) 1-2-1 configuration, the design affords plenty of space.

A raised section under the foot-cubby provides space to stow your carry-on bag during take-off and landing…

… as well as your shoes during the flight.

Other smart storage touches include an amenity storage area above the cocktail tray…

… and a laptop nook conveniently located next to the AC and USB sockets.

Flipping over the back of the 28-inch wide seat converts it into a 78-inch (2 metre) long flat bed complete with mattress, topper and pillow.

The bed is skewed to an angle rather than straight ahead, which means some taller travellers prefer to sleep on their side with a bit of a bend at the knees.

Coupled with that bed, the 'Do Not Disturb' button comes in very handy on the Canberra-Singapore leg.

 

Meal

Despite the very short flying time between Sydney and Canberra, business class passengers enjoy a refreshment en route: on our inaugural flight it was a smoked duck salad.

This had barely been served before the PA announcement advised to prepare for landing and stow the tray tables, and it almost felt like a race against the clock – I’m not sure that the Sydney-Canberra leg even needs a meal squeezed in.

Following our 11.30pm departure from Canberra, supper was served just on midnight. SQ terms this a ‘sleeper service’ with just a main course and a small fruit plate – there’s no fancy appetisers or side dishes.

The meal can be served just after take-off as a very late supper, or two hours before arrival as a very early breakfast.

The business class menu on our flight included braised chicken in saffron & tomato sauce, mushroom quiche, a selection of dim sum., an ‘American breakfast’ (scrambled eggs and chicken sausage served with tomatoes and spinach and potatoes) and a lighter continental breakfast.

Passengers can also choose a dish from Singapore Airlines’ more extensive Book the Cook menu before they fly: you can peruse the full menu here, from which I chose the Tasmanian salmon in wild-lime butter sauce with steamed green beans and pasta.

It would have looked better – and certainly as good as it tasted – without that single soggy lettuce leaf atop the pasta.

Breakfast was available from 3am in Singapore-time, two hours before landing. Hitting your seat’s Do Not Disturb button will go some way towards maximising your sleep, although not everybody can snooze through the brighter cabin lights and the clatter of plates, cups and cutlery – that said, on this flight almost nobody had breakfast.

Entertainment & Service

I’d question if anybody would be watching inflight movies when there’s less than 7 hours for sleeping, and most of the passengers in the business class cabin seemed to agree – after the meal (and sometimes without it) it was time to bunk down.

But if you do want to relax with a video, especially on the flight’s Singapore-Sydney return leg, the massive 18 inch video screen and extensive library with several latest release over and boxed set TV series will keep you happy.

Inflight Internet is also available on Singapore Airlines’ Boeing 777-300ER, with 30MB free for all business class passengers (good for a quick hit of email, online news or social media).

After that 30MB vanishes all-too-quickly you have a choice between three data-capped plans: US$7 for 15MB, US$13 for 30MB and US$20 for 50MB. But the connection proved so slow that I’d suggest it isn't worth signing up for.

Service on this flight was typically Singapore Airlines: prompt yet unobtrusive. Especially on the Canberra-Singapore leg the crew seemed well aware that sleep would be a premium, so they bustled the meals out within a half hour of our departure.

Summary

The flight itself was typically Singapore Airlines and hard to fault for business class. The challenges come from the route and the timing: passengers leaving from Sydney won't be able to sleep until after departing Canberra coming up to midnight, although that's roughly the same 7½ flying time as a straight Sydney-Singapore trip.

Of course, you’ll likely want your accomodation sorted for an early checkin at the hotel after that 5.15am arrival into Singapore – this might mean having your room booked from the day prior.

That given, SQ288 will be a good fit into the schedule of busy Sydney business travellers who want to zip straight from their office to the lounge, while Canberra’s corporate flyers can have a relaxing dinner at home and even tuck the kids into bed before making their way to the airport.

David Flynn travelled as a guest of Singapore Airlines

David Flynn
David Flynn is the editor of Australian Business Traveller and a bit of a travel tragic with a weakness for good coffee, shopping and lychee martinis.
 

43 comments

  • guy

    guy

    3 May, 2018 12:32 pm

    Why do they feel the need to do a breakfast service on such a flight? Do any airlines completely forgo such a service on red eye flights?
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  • watson374

    watson374

    3 May, 2018 01:12 pm

    People like having the option of eating, even if they might decline to.

    However, abbreviated meal service on a red-eye is not a new concept:
    • BA (and also VS in a similar fashion) do offer an abbreviated Sleeper Service whereby passengers in Club World on short eastbound trans-Atlantic red-eyes are served supper in the lounge so they can bed down immediately after the seat-belt sign is extinguished.
    • In Economy, QF used to offer on QF6 (SIN-SYD, near-midnight departure) a light snack on takeoff followed by a hot breakfast before landing, which is much better than trying to scoff a hot meal just before trying to sleep.
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  • paul

    Paully

    3 May, 2018 02:52 pm

    NO Harm in saying " No Thank you " , I have done many times. But it is great to get the option !! Thx SIA
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  • Traveller14

    Traveller14

    4 May, 2018 12:51 pm

    I agree: who wants breakfast at 0300 local or 0500 Australian time? Some want an orange juice or glass of milk, but bacon, or tomatoes, or ham: no thank you.

    Irrespective of mode, it's preferable that bright lights only get switched on an hour before arrival. I assume cabin crew would say it's a safety issue but surely they can carry food and drink with just a small amount of lighting, perhaps at 'half' if there's such an option, or the 'stars' arrangement seen on some more recently introduced frames.

    On many trains and buses throughout the world, one has no or night lighting. This is great for sleep. 'The Overland' between Melbourne and Adelaide when it was a night train was best of all: intelligent 1950s/1960s design saw the conductor able to have full lighting on, then about quarter lights (yellow) and terrific dim blue night lights. Airlines need to learn from this.
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  • watson374

    watson374

    4 May, 2018 03:18 pm

    Absolutely--it's the light that makes all the difference, so I'm a huge fan of mood lighting to create a slow and gentle "sunrise". The "starry night" mode is really nice, too--EK have this.

    I find that I sleep much better with the later departures out of SIN. Before it was axed with the return of QF2 via SIN, QF6 SIN-SYD in Y was an excellent example, with a hot midnight snack served on takeoff and then a proper breakfast at a civilised hour before landing.

    People will always like having the choice of taking the food, but getting the food/sleep balance right without it coming across as el cheapo cost-cutting is difficult, particularly in J.
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  • puppy79

    puppy79

    8 May, 2018 06:22 am

    off the topic I kind of remember flying home from HNL twice in a row in my life when the planes left in the small hours of the new day home to Sydney.a supper at some ungodly hour thanks to the time difference and a breakfast two hours out of sydney and that was a slightly longer flying time.there was the option of not eating at all or partaking.it's an odd ball thing with redeye flights
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  • Nick  Sydney 348

    Nick Sydney 2

    3 May, 2018 12:54 pm

    Wet week in Wagga! Bit hard on Wagga there even if true.... SQ really taking it to QF with five Sydney flights. May well be looking at Star Alliance soon.
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  • Traveller14

    Traveller14

    4 May, 2018 12:54 pm

    SQ also now has four daily Melbourne flights. It's not world best airline for no reason.

    From the passenger figures shown on BITRE, there are always some empty seats, but I can't be lucky, as every SQ flight I've been on ex or to MEL or SYD has been almost full in J and Y.
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  • reeves35

    reeves35

    3 May, 2018 01:02 pm

    Pricing is interesting on this new route. It tends to be about $500 less than direct SYD-SIN service in J & W and $150 less in Y.

    I assume the real reason for this route is to have a late evening departure from SYD that doesn't arrive into SIN in the middle of the night. CBR is an ends to a means rather than an actual route where demand supports it. It will be interesting to see how this route goes.

    Qatar is also running a CBR service though its motives are much more obvious; it enabled them to have another service into SYD in excess of the bilateral. Anecdotal evidence suggests the SYD-CBR-SYD sectors have gone out with as few as 25 pax. Obviously the profit of a second SYD-DOH-SYD service means the low loads are affordable.
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  • Traveller14

    Traveller14

    4 May, 2018 12:59 pm

    reeves35, interestingly in the latest month's figures I've seen (Feb 2018), SQ's passenger numbers between CBR and WLG had risen compared to Feb 2017 and were fairly good.

    However obviously the yields weren't, so that must be a major reason why as David said, the 'route failed.'

    SQ's history and reputation suggests that it will be able to make a go of five flights a day SYD to SIN and back. SIN is a very popular airport.

    Your other observations are very astute.

    We'll sort of be able to tell how DOH - CBR - DOH is doing when BITRE publishes statistics as these show inbound and outbound passengers to/from each Australian international airport to every linked airport overseas. I'll try to remember to submit a post when the figures appear, but there's always a lag of about eight - 10 weeks from the end of a month.
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  • Weng-Lock Mok

    wenglock_mok

    6 May, 2018 08:26 pm

    Actually, before SQ288 was launched, SQ did operate a fifth SQ251/252 frequency on some days of the week (daily during the peak season). That flight operated an hour or so before the SQ231/222 rotation.
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  • anonymous

    anonymous

    3 May, 2018 01:40 pm

    Did you notice how many premium passengers originated in Canberra?
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  • David Flynn

    David

    3 May, 2018 02:17 pm

    I didn't count, but I daresay that numbers for an inaugural are not the best indicator of anything other than that particular flight.
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  • paul

    Paully

    3 May, 2018 02:54 pm

    Was Parliment sitting ? There are always more hangers on at that time !
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  • Lala295

    Lala295

    4 May, 2018 06:46 am

    No, not a parliamentary sitting week
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  • Dale

    hakkinen5

    3 May, 2018 10:10 pm

    Wow $20 for 50MB of internet? In business class? Are they kidding? And its so slow its almost useless? I really like SQ but they need to sort that out. The pricing is outrageous.
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  • xtfer

    xtfer

    4 May, 2018 11:19 am

    Some of their aircraft had a much more reasonable $25 unlimited for the flight price, which I even used for video conferencing, but they seem to have ditched that. Disappointing.
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  • David Flynn

    David

    4 May, 2018 11:31 am

    Yes, SQ has different pricing schemes depending on the aircraft and service provider – on its Airbus A350s you can indeed sign up for the whole flight for US$22.
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    Smithy

  • Bob Burgess

    Bob Burgess

    4 May, 2018 11:34 am

    I agree that SQ needs to make better provision for business class and first class passengers at CBR. Roping off part of the lounge and maybe even having a crew member take coffee orders from those passengers and bring them their free coffee, just a small thing like this would add that 'premium' feeling.
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  • Traveller14

    Traveller14

    4 May, 2018 12:40 pm

    Terrific photos (and text) with the shot of the food at the SQ Sydney lounge capturing the lighting correctly - not always easy.

    I love in your reviews how there's usually a logical sequence of photo then information. Makes them comprehensible. Great effort.

    The SYD - CBR schedule is depart 2120, arrive 2220 hours. This is not a 'full hour in the air' as it includes about 20 minutes allowance for pushback-taxi-takeoff and five minutes for touchdown-to at gate arrival. You are correct that there's some padding, though: common with airline schedules worldwide.

    It would be great if you could as promised do the Philippine Airlines flight review in the next little while.
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  • Lyn Woods

    lw1962

    4 May, 2018 03:19 pm

    Did anyone else notice that delightful "swan" in the coffee?
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  • guy

    guy

    4 May, 2018 03:54 pm

    Lounges in Australia and New Zealand really hit it out of the park when it comes to coffee. Is there a barista service at a lounge anywhere else in the world? I can’t think of one...
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  • xtfer

    xtfer

    4 May, 2018 10:35 pm

    I vaguely recall getting a barista coffee at the GVK Lounge in Mumbai, but it was nothing to write home about.
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  • Merry

    Merry

    4 May, 2018 03:41 pm

    Hi David,
    This is such good news for those of us who are Singapore based but often work in Canberra. If on birds SQ 228 at Canberra, did you notice if the International Lounge next to Virgin;s Lounge was in operation?
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  • Merry

    Merry

    4 May, 2018 03:45 pm

    Oops that should read, 'if one boards SQ 228 at Canberra'!!!
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  • xtfer

    xtfer

    4 May, 2018 10:36 pm

    Virgin keeps the lounge open for those departing Canberra, and you can stay till quite late as there is never a line for immigration.
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  • richard

    rich5011

    4 May, 2018 03:54 pm

    In what way exactly was the Capital Express a "failed" route , bit of kiwi bashing! considering the claimed loadings and the fare levels i struggle with this comment. If WLG is so bad why bother replacing it , however frankly MEL is a much more attractive dest than CBR. and we also dont really appreciate the 15 year old aircraft but we are happy to have SQ make no bones about that . Other than your somewhat ill infoirmed remark unless SQ was telling porkys a great review
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    puppy79

  • Traveller14

    Traveller14

    4 May, 2018 04:03 pm

    You can always look at the loadings yourself by referring to the BITRE's monthly international airlines report. Just go to the last major table and you'll see that Canberra - Wellington (which had only one airline, SQ) will will show how many passengers used the sector in say Feb 2018 v Feb 2017, separately identified for inbound and outbound.
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  • richard

    rich5011

    4 May, 2018 04:24 pm

    thank you for that and i will cos this has been something of a "go round in the media" here . we need longhaul believe me going via akl is just ruibbish

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  • richard

    rich5011

    4 May, 2018 04:28 pm

    very intersting reading
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  • richard

    rich5011

    4 May, 2018 04:34 pm

    so last thing dont those stats show that CBR int uplift was a big increase YOY i havent quite broken it down yet but seems there is demand there. beintersting to see how MEL works for sq

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  • Traveller14

    Traveller14

    4 May, 2018 04:40 pm

    rich5011, I'm in furious agreement that there was 'demand' for (SIN)-CBR-WLG and return but the key is it had to be at what the airline regarded as a 'sustainable' (read: profitable) yield.

    That's where it must have fallen down. As outsiders we don't know what costs an airline loads onto each route sector, but we can deduce that in the end, it didn't stack up for SQ.
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  • Weng-Lock Mok

    wenglock_mok

    4 May, 2018 06:01 pm

    I sort of deduced from reading the press releases that came out when they announced these changes that both markets were growing but maybe not at the same rate, with CBR growing quite a bit faster than WLG was.

    They also mentioned something about more WLG passengers connecting through to Europe, whereas the CBR passengers were connecting through to Asia and so I guess that was the reason why the flights are timed they way they are.

    It's quite a good solution if you think about it - they're basically using mature markets (SYD for CBR and MEL for WLG) to bolster loads for both cities (maybe less so for CBR than for WLG) and hopefully in time, grow the market enough that in time both cities will be able to have their own flights and not be tag-ons. Nonetheless, given that WLG has runway length limitations, long-haul services would have to have an en-route stop somewhere anyway.
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  • xtfer

    xtfer

    4 May, 2018 10:47 pm

    BITRE figures for February showed 1300 people travelled on the CBR > WLG flight on Singapore airlines, in each direction, not including those going from or to Singapore.

    Thats more than a full 737-800 every day. It's only a matter of time before someone plugs that gap with a suitably sized plane...
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  • xtfer

    xtfer

    4 May, 2018 10:55 pm

    Actually, it's late and I've failed at math. It's more like 15 flights a month...
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  • AJW

    AJW

    6 May, 2018 07:51 pm

    My maths says 8 if 1300 was each way for the month.
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  • puppy79

    puppy79

    6 May, 2018 08:38 am

    the thing with wellington is that it was the wrong aircraft.the a330 was more than enough for them in capacity and still a good plane.it's like they treat second grade cities like that.the rest gets the latest and greatest and smaller places miss out.WLG IS LIKE ADL AND PER.ALL YOU NEED IS A A330 and honestly the 777's on those services were getting old.fine within Asia but you would not want to be doing canberra or melbourne or sydney in one.
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  • AJW

    AJW

    6 May, 2018 07:50 pm

    They wanted the extra J capacity that 777-200 gave over the A330.

    And the product on those 777’s and A330’s were much the same. About the only difference was the A330 had a newer version of the IFE system but other than that same seats etc.
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  • CityRail

    CityRail

    5 May, 2018 09:50 am

    May I ask for SYD-CBR sector, was any food or drink offered in this short flight?
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  • David Flynn

    David

    5 May, 2018 12:44 pm

    That's covered in the review.
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  • Smithy

    Smithy

    5 May, 2018 11:03 am

    Wagga Wagga never Wagga is a great place !

    Interesting .. Great for ACT & close by like Wagga Wagga ( 2 1/2 drive or 1 hour in a Cessna 172 lol ).

    Productive choice out of Sydney but CBR need to up there game for transit pax :)P
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  • brent

    freedomflyer

    6 May, 2018 08:37 am

    Nice to have choice of flight times from Australian cities to Singapore in reference to taking on Qantas. One needs to understand, SQ have a major hub in SIN with connecting flights to all parts of Asia, Middle East and Europe. As an ex employee for SQ I can tell you that up to three quarters of their passengers are connecting to other ports. Not too many passengers are going only to Singapore. Without that Singapore Hub, SQ would not be operating their shcedule as it is currently. Same goes for airlines like CX, TG,EY, EK, etc. They all have Hubs at heir home ports. Hubs they can use significantly. Most QF passengers are only going to Singapore and as a consequence, they only operate a limited number of flights.Most of these airlines, SQ, and others, are nice to fly with, but they do have significant hub benefits they are able to take advantage of.
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  • tonywills

    tonywills

    21 Aug, 2018 04:16 am

    Any idea on whether there is another round of CIQ in Canberra? For example, am I allowed to buy duty free liquor when I board at SYD, transiting through CBR and onwards to SIN?
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20 Oct, 2018 07:21 am

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