JAL cancels Boeing 787 Sydney-Tokyo flights

JAL cancels Boeing 787 Sydney-Tokyo flights

Qantas partner Japan Airlines (JAL) has axed next month's launch of a daily Boeing 787 service between Sydney and Tokyo due to safety concerns over flying the aircraft near thunderstorms.

Japan Airlines planned the inaugural Australian flight of its Boeing 787 for December 2nd, however a JAL spokesman has told Australian Business Traveller "I can confirm that we have had to delay the introduction of 787 on the Sydney route."

"At this stage we have no idea how long it will be before we are able to introduce the 787 on the Sydney route."

The airline will continue to run its daily JL771/772 service between Sydney and Tokyo/Narita on the current Boeing 777-200 "until further notice", he added.

JAL has also pulled the Boeing 787 from several other domestic and international routes following a warning from Boeing that all 787s powered by General Electrics' GEnx engines to avoid flying within 90 kilometres of thunderstorms, which are commonplace in certain regions during the summer months.

"As we have always navigated along routes while avoiding thunderstorm clouds etc, safety in operations has been ensured in this regard" JAL explained in a statement.

However, under Boeing's advice, "we will be required to avoid active clouds of this kind at a wider range than before, and consequently, we have found that depending on weather conditions on the day of the flight, the possibility of significant delays and cancellations would increase if we avoided these cloud zones on some of our routes."

At issue is a build-up of ice crystals in the engine's front fan, which has to date caused a temporary loss of thrust in six GEnx-powered Boeings (one Dreamliner and five 747-8s) between April and November.

"The aviation industry is experiencing a growing number of ice-crystal icing encounters in recent years as the population of the large commercial airliners has grown, particularly in tropical regions of the world" a GE spokesman told international news agency Reuters.

Boeing and GE are working on software changes to the engine control system which should eliminate the problem.

The Boeing 787s flown by Jetstar and Air India are also fitted with GEnx engines, and while Jetstar doesn't expect the warning will have a significant impact on its schedule, the airline says it will "follow the recommendations of Boeing or regulators as they arise."

Air India has yet to release any comment on the issue and how this may affect its daily flight between Sydney/Melbourne and New Delhi.

Keep up to date with the latest news for business travellers and frequent flyers: follow @AusBT on Twitter.

David Flynn
David Flynn is the editor of Australian Business Traveller and a bit of a travel tragic with a weakness for good coffee, shopping and lychee martinis.
 

4 comments

  • Yusef Danet

    Yusef Danet

    26 Nov, 2013 11:16 am

    If Jetstar can fly to Bali in December staying 50nm / 90km from thunderstorms I would be impressed! 

    No member give thanks

  • eminere

    eminere

    26 Nov, 2013 08:20 pm

    Incredible.  Is no airline asking Boeing and/or GE for compensation? 

    No member give thanks

  • Phalanger

    Phalanger

    26 Nov, 2013 11:51 pm

    Early adopter airlines get a massive discount on the standard prices with specifically limited liabilities because the aircraft will be going through this development process while being used.  These are complex machines and not simple consumer developments and contracts.

    No member give thanks

  • eminere

    eminere

    26 Nov, 2013 11:55 pm

    That's convenient.

    No member give thanks

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26 May, 2019 07:27 am

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