Qantas's presence in Asia and America

By adethyasjce | May 20, 2019, 10:46 PM
I wish Qantas would re start its Mumbai service in light of the Jet Airways collapse.

Agree. Much easier to connect to India
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By jubbing | May 20, 2019, 11:26 PM
I wish Qantas would re start its Mumbai service in light of the Jet Airways collapse.

Agree. Much easier to connect to India

I'm honestly surprised they don't already have a direct flight to Indi - no oneworld airline does (just Air India I think?). Australia has such as MASSIVE Indian population that I'm sure if priced well, it would sell out no worries. Mumbai, Delhi, or Bangalore would be my go to places (though I reckon Mumbai makes more sense).
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By hutch | May 21, 2019, 01:40 AM
What a very odd post...

Meanwhile, I throw my support in for some India flights.

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By Nick Sydney 2 | May 22, 2019, 04:47 PM
Trivial Pusuits question
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By John Phelan | May 23, 2019, 01:09 AM
Qantas has never flown its own aircraft to Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Washington or Ho Chi Minh - these were codeshares on other airlines.

Taipei was served by a Qantas subsidiary - Australia Asia Airlines. This was to avoid offending the Chinese government - ridiculous.

To the best of my knowledge, QF has never flown its own aircraft to Seoul, either.

Qantas definitely flew to Chicago in 2003, from Melbourne using a 747. From memory they also flew their own planes to Seoul from Brisbane in the mid 2000's

Last edited by ausengineer at May 20, 2019, 10.49 AM.

Err, no. Qantas *announced* the service to Chicago - but then cancelled it before it ever started.

It was to be a tag flight of QF93-94 and was supposed to fly MEL-LAX-ORD. They sold tickets - but then cancelled the plan and refunded the tickets.
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By johnaboxall | May 23, 2019, 11:26 AM
I think the best part of Qantas is that their best destination network is in Asia and America. But (like the Middle East and Europe) they still have some terminated destinations. So my question is:


Why did Qantas terminate the following Asian and American cities?


Honiara:

Seoul (both airports):

Taipei:

Atlanta:

Boston:

Chicago:

Washington DC:

Ho Chi Minh City:


What aircraft did they use on the routes prior to termination?


OPTIONAL: What was the flight number?


Anyone who knows the answers, thank you and please write it as I did above. If you have more information on one of these particular routes, fabulous!


Thank you!


P.S. This is my first post on the site, so I hope I get used to it.


Watch ebay for old QF printed timetables.
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By Ryan K | May 23, 2019, 12:28 PM
Qantas has never flown its own aircraft to Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Washington or Ho Chi Minh - these were codeshares on other airlines.

Taipei was served by a Qantas subsidiary - Australia Asia Airlines. This was to avoid offending the Chinese government - ridiculous.

To the best of my knowledge, QF has never flown its own aircraft to Seoul, either.

Qantas definitely flew to Chicago in 2003, from Melbourne using a 747. From memory they also flew their own planes to Seoul from Brisbane in the mid 2000's

Last edited by ausengineer at May 20, 2019, 10.49 AM.

I was under the impression that these Chicago flights never eventuated in the end.
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By johnaboxall | May 23, 2019, 01:13 PM
What a very odd post...

Meanwhile, I throw my support in for some India flights.


They tried an A330 tag flight from SIN a while ago, didn't work out that well. Rumour was too many staff kept calling in sick for the tag flight.
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By hutch | May 23, 2019, 06:05 PM
What a very odd post...

Meanwhile, I throw my support in for some India flights.


They tried an A330 tag flight from SIN a while ago, didn't work out that well. Rumour was too many staff kept calling in sick for the tag flight.

Yep. I believe the tag flight even was a 747 at one point. Didn't have a good arrival time off my memory.
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By ljot | May 25, 2019, 09:03 AM
So the main reason why these routes were stopped (and many others including mainland Europe and Africa) was because....

Back in the '70s and '80s they wasn't a thing called oneworld alliance. There weren't even any alliances in the aviation industry. So it made a lot of common sense for QF to fly to all sorts of places. But when oneworld barged in, sigh, unfortunately that's when QF picked up the axe. First they chopped up BEG, then most middle eastern destinations, like THR, KHI, BAH and DAM, but that was before oneworld came in. When it came in though, destinations such as TPE, BOM, FRA, CDG, ATH, FUK, NKM, CTS, FCO, HRE, ATL, BOS, ORD (they swung the axe on the Chicago route long before the first service was even scheduled, am I right?), IAH, ICN and SGN.

OK, that was a big scoop of info, wasn't it?
If you need more info, just write it down!

Sincerely,
ljot
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By ljot | May 25, 2019, 09:06 AM
Oh and, even though DXB was started long after oneworld formed, it got chopped (boo hoo) meaning QF has officially packed up their bags and left the Middle East for good.
(Little cheat sheet; DXB got terminated because of QF's favour to improve their Asian network (it was doing bad at the time) and they had a partnership with EK, so there is really no point of losing money anyway.)

Hope this gave you a teensy bit more info!

Sincerely,
ljot
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By moa999 | May 25, 2019, 10:47 PM
I don't think SIN was losing money in the previous state, though acknowledge a percentage of people preferred not to fly via DXB.

SIN is also important for transfers to 3K Jetstar Asia
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By patrickk | May 26, 2019, 05:01 PM
Most of those mid west eastern US cities you mention would require an intermediate stop and as stops cost money and as they cannot pick up passengers can quickly become non-viable. The clear exception is New York, but that involves a LA hub with passengers from three routes joining. The others probably couldn’t hub enough high yiepassengers through.
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By Himeno | May 29, 2019, 01:22 AM
So the main reason why these routes were stopped (and many others including mainland Europe and Africa) was because....

Back in the '70s and '80s they wasn't a thing called oneworld alliance. There weren't even any alliances in the aviation industry. So it made a lot of common sense for QF to fly to all sorts of places. But when oneworld barged in, sigh, unfortunately that's when QF picked up the axe. First they chopped up BEG, then most middle eastern destinations, like THR, KHI, BAH and DAM, but that was before oneworld came in. When it came in though, destinations such as TPE, BOM, FRA, CDG, ATH, FUK, NKM, CTS, FCO, HRE, ATL, BOS, ORD (they swung the axe on the Chicago route long before the first service was even scheduled, am I right?), IAH, ICN and SGN.

OK, that was a big scoop of info, wasn't it?
If you need more info, just write it down!

Sincerely,
ljot

Alliances have little to no reason for why a given route is dropped, especially the routes you're asking about.
Most of the routes Qantas used to fly to in the 70s, 80's and early 90s were dropped because they no longer needed to make stops for fuel in random places as the range of aircraft got better.
You'll find that the vast majority of the cuts in the Pacific, Asia, Middle East and Europe match with new aircraft arrivals, eg 707s being replaced by 747-100s, or 747-200s being replaced by -300s.

Other cuts were due to the port no longer being safe to fly to (certain African and middle east airports), no longer making money, or legal requirements (eg, Qantas wants to fly to Paris, but only if they can get daily flights. The current air service agreement with France won't allow daily flights with 747/A380 sized aircraft - it allows 3 weekly flights. They could fly 6 weekly with their 787 config, but if that same aircraft had 6 seats more, they could only have 5 weekly).

Qantas flights to ORD were planned and scheduled, signage, staff and contracts made at ORD, then a short time before the flights were due to start, Qantas pulled the plan. The common suggestion is because of an agreement with United. At the time, it was only Qantas and United on the Australia-US trans pac route. United didn't want Qantas flying to another of their hubs and United was planning to fly to AKL and the UA AKL and QF ORD planned flights both disappeared around the same time.
Of course, things have changed now with QF pulling out of the AKL-LAX route and AA, DL and VA joining QF and UA on the AU-US route.

Qantas resumed flights to DXB in 2013 because they were required to under the terms of their agreement with EK. Period.
The 5 year agreement expired, and changes were made when it was renewed. They had new aircraft arrive in that period and had feedback that people preferred to stop over in South East/East Asia rather then Dubai and so shifted to the current option of one stop to London via PER or SIN and codeshares to Europe via DXB when the agreement was changed and renewed in 2018.
The requirement to stop in Dubai no longer existed, people didn't want to stop in Dubai, so Qantas gave their passengers what they wanted. Singapore.

The most common reasons for any airline to drop any given route isn't some crazy mystery to be uncovered. They either no longer need to, the port wasn't making money or they can use their equipment better elsewhere.

Really Ijot, you've asked the same thing a number of times on a number of sites. People have given you the reasons for the routes being cut a number of times, but you don't seem to be listening to what people tell you. You keep making up reasons that have no basis in realaity.
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By Red Cee | May 29, 2019, 11:53 PM
All to do with economics. If it isn’t viable to operate the route, they won’t. They may offer it as a codeshare, to try to keep an appearance in that port. As an example, how many European airlines that used to fly here no longer do?
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